The 761st Tank Battalion. Ben Lear.

The 761st Tank Battalion was formed in the spring of 1942 and according to Army historical records, had 30 black officers, six white officers, and 676 enlisted men. The III Corps serves as host unit. For more information, see the TMP FAQ. Over the course of 183 days of continuous fighting (including action in the Battle of the Bulge) the "Black Panthers" became the first African-American armored unit to enter combat. All members in good standing are free to post here. The 761 st was activated 1 April 1942. T.J. Mills Boulevard, Killeen, TX 76544. He told the black tankers that they would see combat and started to train them for war.

Posted on July 12, 2011 by Brittany Leddy — No Comments ↓ By Charles W. Sasser. The 761 st Battalion trained at Camp Hood, Texas, where they received a superior rating from Second Army Commander Lt. Gen. Ben Lear. Veterans who participated in the liberation of these camps deny that the soldiers of the 761st Tank Battalion were there, and the US Army does not recognize the 761st as liberators of any of the Nazi camps. Fort Hood is located in Killeen, Texas between Austin and Waco. 761st Tank Battalion The 761st Tank Battalion is probably the most famous of the World War II tank battalions organized using African-American personnel. Brothers in Arms is the actual, heroic account of the 761st Tank Battalion, an African-American armored unit that fought in World War II.

Constituted 15 March 1942 in the Army of the United States, the battalion was activated 1 April 1942 at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. A cold January rain drizzled onto the rolling red-dust hills of central Oklahoma the day Ruben Rivers walked to war. They were also the first African-American armoured unit to enter combat. They landed on the Continent with high morale -- some said they were … Over 100,000 German soldiers, fleeing the advancing Soviet Red Army, surrendered to American troops, who herded them into a large field that had become a makeshift holding facility.

Directed by Pete Chatmon. The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944. They were known as the “Black Panthers” and their unit's motto was “Come out fighting." The 761st Tank Battalion was the last of the three United States Army segregated combat tank battalion during World War II. "761st Tank Battalion: Patton’s Panthers Would Not Quit" Topic. Directed by Pete Chatmon. Later referred to as the Black Panther Tank Battalion, the 761st was attached to the XII Corps' 26th Infantry Division, assigned to Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s Third Army; an army already racing eastward across France, and committed to combat on Nov. 7, 1944. During the first year, no one expected the battalion to see combat, but in may of 1943 Major Paul Bates became commander. Fort Hood Directory. The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944. The 761st Tank Battalion remained in constant combat for 183 days, from the time it entered WWII in November 1944 until the World War II ended. The 761st Tank Battalion was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944. 254-287-1110. 761st Tank Battalion: Patton’s Panthers Would Not Quit.

Fort Hood Official Website. The documentary, which was touted as historically accurate, claimed that the 761st Tank Battalion, attached to the 71st Division, liberated both Buchenwald and Dachau.

Over the course of 183 days of continuous fighting (including action in the Battle of the Bulge) the "Black Panthers" became the first African-American armored unit to enter combat. It is one of the largest US military installations in the world.